Coping and support

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Emotional support and opportunities for achievement in activities that don't involve reading are important for children with dyslexia. If your child has dyslexia:

  • Be supportive. Trouble learning to read may affect your child's self-esteem. Be sure to express your love and support. Encourage your child by praising his or her talents and strengths.
  • Talk to your child. Explain to your child what dyslexia is and that it's not a failure on his or her part. The better your child understands this, the better he or she will be able to cope with having a learning disability.
  • Take steps to help your child learn at home. Provide a clean, quiet, organized place for your child to study, and designate a study time. Also, make sure your child gets enough rest and eats regular, healthy meals.
  • Stay in contact with your child's teachers. Talk with teachers frequently to make sure your child is able to stay on track. Be sure he or she gets extra time for tests that require reading, if needed. Ask your child's teacher if it would help your child to record the day's lessons to play back later.
  • Join a support group. This can help you stay in contact with parents who face similar learning disabilities in their children. Support groups can provide useful information and emotional support. Check with your doctor or your child's reading specialist to find out if there are any support groups in your area. Or, search on the Internet for dyslexia or reading disability support groups.
Aug. 23, 2011

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