Preparing for your appointment

You're likely to start by seeing your family doctor. He or she may refer you to a doctor who specializes in skin disorders (dermatologist). Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

Before your appointment, you may want to write a list that answers the following questions:

  • Have you experienced this problem in the past?
  • Do you have allergies to certain substances such as rubber, glues, fragrances or nickel?
  • Have your stress levels worsened recently?
  • What medications and supplements do you take regularly?
  • Are you exposed to certain metals or chemicals in the work setting or through hobbies?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, such as:

  • When did you first begin experiencing symptoms?
  • Have your symptoms been continuous or occasional?
  • How severe are your symptoms?
  • What, if anything, seems to improve your symptoms?
  • What, if anything, appears to worsen your symptoms?
  • Are you exposed to chemicals or metals in the work setting or through a hobby?
April 30, 2016
References
  1. Wolff K, et al. Eczema/Dermatitis. In: Fitzpatrick's Color Atlas and Synopsis of Clinical Dermatology. 7th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2013. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Feb. 24, 2016.
  2. Adams DR, et al. Acute palmoplantar eczema (dyshidrotic eczema). http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 24, 2016.
  3. Hand and foot dermatitis. Merck Manuals Professional Edition. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/dermatologic-disorders/dermatitis/hand-and-foot-dermatitis. Accessed March 4, 2016.
  4. Goldsmith LA, et al., eds. Vesicular palmoplantar eczema. In: Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. 8th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2012. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed March 4, 2016.
  5. Gibson LE (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. March 17, 2016.