Treatments and drugs

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Depending on the severity of your signs and symptoms, treatment options may include:

  • Corticosteroids. High-potency corticosteroid creams and ointments can help speed the disappearance of the blisters. Wrapping the treated area in plastic wrap can improve absorption. Moist compresses also may be applied after the application of a corticosteroid to enhance the absorption of the medication. In severe cases, your doctor may prescribe corticosteroid pills, such as prednisone. Long-term use of steroids can cause serious side effects.
  • Phototherapy. If other treatments aren't effective, your doctor may recommend a special kind of light therapy that combines exposure to ultraviolet light with drugs that help make your skin more receptive to the effects of this type of light.
  • Immune-suppressing ointments. Medications such as tacrolimus (Protopic) and pimecrolimus (Elidel) may be helpful for people who want to limit their exposure to steroids. However, these drugs can increase the risk of skin infections.
  • Botulinum toxin injections. Some doctors may consider recommending botulinum toxin injections to treat severe cases of dyshidrosis. However, this is a relatively new treatment option that has not yet gained general acceptance.
May. 03, 2013