Preparing for your appointment

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

Before your appointment, make a list of:

  • Any symptoms you're experiencing, including any that may seem unrelated to the reason for your appointment
  • Key personal information, including any major stresses or recent life changes, which may contribute to dry mouth
  • All prescribed medications, vitamins, herbs, other supplements and over-the-counter medications you're taking, including the dosages
  • Questions to ask your doctor

Some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What is likely causing my dry mouth?
  • What are other possible causes?
  • Is my condition likely temporary or long term?
  • What's the best course of action?
  • I have other health conditions. Could this be related to any of them?
  • Are there any restrictions that I need to follow?
  • Is there a generic alternative to the medicine you're prescribing?
  • Are there any brochures or other printed material that I can have? What websites do you recommend?

Don't hesitate to ask other questions during your appointment.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you several questions. Be ready to answer them to reserve time to go over any points you want to spend more time on. Your doctor may ask:

  • When did you start experiencing symptoms?
  • Have your symptoms been continuous or occasional?
  • Have you started taking any new medications recently?
  • Do you smoke or chew tobacco?
  • How much alcohol do you drink?
  • Does anything improve your symptoms or stimulate saliva flow?
  • What, if anything, appears to worsen your symptoms?
May 05, 2017
References
  1. Dry mouth. National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. https://www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/DryMouth/DryMouth.htm. Accessed Feb. 15, 2017.
  2. Dry mouth? Don't delay treatment. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. http://www.fda.gov/forconsumers/consumerupdates/ucm254273.htm. Accessed Feb. 15, 2017.
  3. Xerostomia (dry mouth). American Dental Association. http://www.ada.org/en/member-center/oral-health-topics/xerostomia. Accessed Feb. 15, 2017.
  4. Xerostomia. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/dental-disorders/symptoms-of-dental-and-oral-disorders/xerostomia. Accessed Feb. 15, 2017.
  5. Dry mouth. Natural Medicines. https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com. Accessed Feb. 15, 2017.
  6. Xerostomia. American Academy of Oral Medicine. http://www.aaom.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=107:xerostomia&catid=22:patient-condition-information&Itemid=120. Accessed Feb. 16, 2017.
  7. Xylitol. Natural Medicines. https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com. Accessed Feb. 15, 2017.
  8. Dry Mouth. American Academy of Oral Medicine. http://www.aaom.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=124:dry-mouth&catid=22:patient-condition-information&Itemid=120. Accessed Feb. 16, 2017.
  9. Wilkinson JM (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Feb. 27, 2017.