Tests and diagnosis

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Your doctor will conduct a thorough physical examination, including listening to your heart with a stethoscope. Certain characteristic sounds can indicate that your pericardium is inflamed or that fluid has accumulated around your heart.

Your doctor might then recommend tests, such as:

  • Echocardiogram. Sound waves produce an image of your heart, helping your doctor to see if fluid is collecting around it.
  • Electrocardiogram. Electrical impulses in your heart are recorded through wires attached to your skin. Certain changes in the electrical impulses can indicate pressure on your heart. But electrocardiogram readings may be abnormal after heart surgery, so your doctor likely won't rely on this one test for a diagnosis of Dressler's syndrome.
  • Chest X-ray. An X-ray can help detect fluid building up around the heart or lungs and can help exclude other causes of your symptoms, such as pneumonia.
  • Blood tests. The results of certain tests can indicate inflammatory activity that's consistent with Dressler's syndrome.
July 09, 2015