Tests and diagnosis

By Mayo Clinic Staff

A double uterus may be diagnosed during a routine pelvic exam when your doctor observes a double cervix or feels an abnormally shaped uterus. If your doctor suspects an abnormality, he or she may recommend any of the following tests:

  • Ultrasound. This test uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of the inside of your body. To capture the images, a device called a transducer is either pressed against your abdominal skin or inserted into your vagina (transvaginal ultrasound). Both types of ultrasound may be done to get the best view. A 3-D ultrasound may be used where available.
  • Sonohysterogram. The sonohysterogram (son-o-HIS-ter-o-gram), an ultrasound scan, is done after fluid is injected through a tube into your uterus by way of your vagina and cervix. This allows your doctor to look for problems in the shape of your uterus.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI machine looks like a tunnel that has both ends open. You lie down on a movable table that slides into the opening of the tunnel. This painless procedure uses a magnetic field and radio waves to create cross-sectional images of the inside of your body.
  • Hysterosalpingography. During a hysterosalpingography (his-tur-o-sal-ping-GOG-ruh-fe), a special dye is injected into your uterus through your cervix. As the dye moves through your reproductive organs, X-rays are taken to determine the shape and size of your uterus and whether your fallopian tubes are open.
Apr. 02, 2013