Self-management

Prevention

Children who are physically, emotionally or sexually abused are at increased risk of developing mental health disorders, such as dissociative disorders. If stress or other personal issues are affecting the way you treat your child, seek help.

  • Talk to a trusted person such as a friend, your doctor or a leader in your faith community.
  • Ask for help locating resources such as parenting support groups and family therapists.
  • Look for churches and community education programs that offer parenting classes that also may help you learn a healthier parenting style.

If your child has been abused or has experienced another traumatic event, see a doctor immediately. Your doctor can refer you to a mental health professional who can help your child recover and adopt healthy coping skills.

Feb. 16, 2017
References
  1. Dissociative disorders. In: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-5. 5th ed. Arlington, Va.: American Psychiatric Association; 2013. http://www.psychiatryonline.org. Accessed Oct. 11, 2016.
  2. Dissociative disorders. National Alliance on Mental Illness. http://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Dissociative-Disorders. Accessed Oct. 11, 2016.
  3. Dissociative disorders. American Psychiatric Association. https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/dissociative-disorders/what-are-dissociative-disorders. Accessed Oct. 11, 2016.
  4. Dissociative disorders. Merck Manuals Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/psychiatric-disorders/dissociative-disorders/overview-of-dissociative-disorders. Accessed Oct. 11, 2016.
  5. Palmer BA (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Oct. 30, 2016.