Overview

A dislocation is an injury to a joint — a place where two or more bones come together — in which the ends of your bones are forced from their normal positions. This painful injury temporarily deforms and immobilizes your joint.

Dislocation is most common in shoulders and fingers. Other sites include elbows, knees and hips. If you suspect a dislocation, seek prompt medical attention to return your bones to their proper positions.

When treated properly, most dislocations return to normal function after several weeks of rest and rehabilitation. However, some joints, such as your shoulder, may have an increased risk of repeat dislocation.

Dec. 23, 2016
References
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  2. Babhulkar A, et al. Acromioclavicular joint dislocations. Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine. 2014;7:33.
  3. Sherman SC. Shoulder dislocation and reduction. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 3, 2016.
  4. Joshi SV. Digit dislocation reduction. http://www.update.com/home. Accessed July 3, 2016.
  5. Elbow dislocation. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic= a00029. Accessed July 3, 2016.
  6. Canale ST, et al. Recurrent dislocations. In: Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics. 12th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2013. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed July 3, 2016.
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