Living with diabetes blog

With diabetes, kidney care is crucial

By Nancy Klobassa Davidson, R.N. and Peggy Moreland, R.N. March 23, 2010

The risk for chronic kidney disease is high for people with diabetes. Fifty percent of those with diabetes don't know it and aren't getting the treatment they need. Did you know that approximately 40 percent of people with diabetes will develop chronic kidney disease? It creeps in silently and symptoms develop late, when the kidneys have failed. But it's possible to cut your risk by taking the following steps:

  • Monitor your blood sugar regularly — work with your diabetes care team to keep your blood sugars within your blood glucose goal range.
  • Get regular screening for kidney disease — kidney damage can be slowed down if detected early.
  • Increase physical activity — daily physical activity and exercise helps to control blood pressure and helps to lower your blood sugar.
  • Quit smoking — smoking reduces blood flow to the kidneys therefore kidneys cannot function at their best. Smokers are more likely to develop kidney disease. Smoking not only tends to raise blood sugar, it also makes it harder for your body to use insulin. I can go on about the negative effects of smoking but will save that for another blog!
  • Use non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen and naproxen with caution. Regular use can trigger kidney damage. Seek the advice of your healthcare provider as regular use of these medications should be monitored.

Kidneys help your body to get rid of toxins and excess water from the blood. Kidneys also regulate blood sugar, monitor blood levels of sodium and potassium, and regulate the acidity of your blood. Another important role of the kidneys is to make red blood cells. So, don't ignore your kidneys. Take care of your kidneys and they will take care of you for many years to come! Looking forward to hearing from you.

Peggy

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Mar. 23, 2010