Some men with delayed ejaculation need 30 minutes or more of sexual stimulation to have an orgasm and ejaculate. Or, they may not be able to ejaculate at all (anejaculation).

But, there's no specific time that indicates a diagnosis of delayed ejaculation. Instead, a man is probably experiencing delayed ejaculation if the delay is causing him distress or frustration, or if he has to stop sexual activity due to fatigue, physical irritation, loss of erection or a request from his partner.

Often, a man might have difficulty reaching orgasm during sexual intercourse or other sexual activities with a partner. Some men can ejaculate only when masturbating.

Delayed orgasm is divided into the following types based on symptoms:

  • Lifelong vs. acquired. With lifelong delayed ejaculation, the problem is present from the time a male reaches sexual maturity. Acquired delayed ejaculation occurs after a period of normal sexual functioning.
  • Generalized vs. situational. Generalized delayed ejaculation isn't limited to certain sex partners or certain kinds of stimulation. Situational delayed ejaculation occurs only under certain circumstances.

These categories help in diagnosing an underlying cause, and determining what might be the most effective treatment.

When to see a doctor

Your primary care doctor is a good place to start when you have delayed ejaculation. See your doctor if:

  • Delayed ejaculation is an issue for you or your partner
  • You have another known health problem that may be linked to delayed ejaculation, or you take medications that could be causing the problem
  • You have other symptoms along with delayed ejaculation that may or may not seem related
April 17, 2015