Lifestyle and home remedies

By Mayo Clinic Staff

In addition to professional treatment, you can build on your treatment plan by following these lifestyle and self-care steps:

  • Take your medications as directed. Even if you're feeling well, resist any temptation to skip your medications. If you stop, cyclothymia symptoms are likely to come back.
  • Pay attention to warning signs. You may have identified a pattern to your cyclothymia symptoms and what triggers them. Follow your treatment plan if you feel you're facing a period of high or low symptoms. Involve family members or friends in watching for warning signs. Addressing symptoms early may keep them from getting worse.
  • Quit drinking or using recreational drugs. Alcohol and recreational drugs may trigger mood changes. Talk to your doctor if you have trouble quitting on your own.
  • Check first before taking other medications. Call the doctor who's treating you for cyclothymia before you take over-the-counter medications or medications prescribed by another doctor. Sometimes other medications trigger periods of cyclothymia or may interfere with medications you're already taking.
  • Keep a record. Track your moods, daily routines and significant life events. These records may help you and your mental health provider understand the effect of treatments and identify thinking patterns and behaviors associated with cyclothymia symptoms.
  • Get regular physical activity and exercise. Moderate, regular physical activity and exercise can help steady your mood. Working out releases brain chemicals that make you feel good (endorphins), can help you sleep and has a number of other benefits. Check with your doctor before starting any exercise program.
  • Get plenty of sleep. Don't stay up all night. Instead, get plenty of sleep. Sleeping enough is an important part of managing your mood. If you have trouble sleeping, talk to your doctor or mental health provider about what you can do.
June 04, 2015