Preparing for your appointment

If your primary care doctor suspects that you have COPD, you'll likely be referred to a pulmonologist — a doctor who specializes in lung disorders.

What you can do

Before your appointment, you might want to write a list of answers to the following questions:

  • What symptoms are you experiencing? When did they start?
  • What makes your symptoms worse? Better?
  • Does anyone in your family have COPD?
  • Have you had any treatment for COPD? If so, what was it and did it help?
  • Have you ever taken beta blockers for your high blood pressure or heart?
  • Are you being treated for any other medical conditions?
  • What medications and supplements do you take regularly?

You might want to have a friend or family member accompany you to your appointment. Often, two sets of ears are better than one when you're learning about a complicated medical problem, such as COPD. Take notes if this helps.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor may ask some of the following questions:

  • How long have you had a cough?
  • Do you get short of breath easily?
  • Have you noticed any wheezing when you breathe?
  • Do you or have you ever smoked cigarettes?
  • Would you like help in quitting?
July 12, 2016
References
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  12. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. March 22, 2016.
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