Preparing for your appointment

You may start by seeing your family doctor or your child's pediatrician. He or she may refer you to a doctor who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of conditions related to the adrenal glands (pediatric endocrinologist).

Here's some information to help you prepare for your appointment. Consider taking a family member or friend along for support and to help you remember information.

What you can do

To prepare for your appointment:

  • Find out if your child needs to follow any pre-appointment restrictions, such as changing food or liquid intake to get ready for blood and urine tests.
  • Make a list of any signs and symptoms your child has been experiencing, and for how long.
  • Make a list of your child's key medical information, including recent illnesses, any medical conditions, and the names and dosages of any medications, vitamins, herbs or other supplements.
  • Prepare questions you want to ask your doctor.

Some basic questions to ask your doctor may include:

  • What is likely causing my child's signs and symptoms?
  • Are there any other possible causes for these symptoms?
  • What kinds of tests does my child need?
  • What treatment approach do you recommend?
  • What are the expected results of treatment?
  • What are the possible side effects of treatment?
  • How will you monitor my child's health over time?
  • What is my child's risk of long-term complications?
  • Do you recommend that my child receive psychological counseling?
  • Do you recommend that our family meet with a genetic counselor?

Don't hesitate to ask any other questions during your appointment.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions. Be ready to answer them to reserve time to go over points you want to focus on. For example, your doctor may ask:

  • What are your child's symptoms?
  • When did you first begin noticing these symptoms?
  • Has anyone in your family been diagnosed with congenital adrenal hyperplasia? If so, do you know how it was treated?
  • Are you planning to have more children?
    Aug. 11, 2017
    References
    1. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia. National Organization for Rare Diseases. https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/congenital-adrenal-hyperplasia/. Accessed Oct. 7, 2016.
    2. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center. https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/1467/congenital-adrenal-hyperplasia. Accessed Oct. 7, 2016.
    3. Overview of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/pediatrics/endocrine-disorders-in-children/overview-of-congenital-adrenal-hyperplasia. Accessed Oct. 7, 2016.
    4. Bomberg EM, et al. The relation of peripubertal and pubertal growth to final adult height in children with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Journal of Pediatrics. 2015;166:743.
    5. Sarafoglou K, et al. Impact of hydrocortisone on adult height in congenital adrenal hyperplasia — the Minnesota cohort. Journal of Pediatrics. 2014;164:1141.
    6. Sarafoglou K, et al. Cases of congenital adrenal hyperplasia missed by newborn screening in Minnesota. JAMA. 2012;307:2371.
    7. Pediatric endocrinology fact sheet: Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) ― A guide for families. American Academy of Pediatrics and Pediatric Endocrine Society. https://www.aap.org/en-us/Documents/soen_confenital_adrenal_hyperplasia.pdf. Accessed Oct. 7, 2016.
    8. Yau M, et al. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America. 2016;45:267.
    9. Maccabee-Ryaboy N, et al. Hypertension in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Clinical Endocrinology. 2016;85:528.
    10. Lteif AN (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 4, 2017.