Colon polyps care at Mayo Clinic

Your Mayo Clinic care team

Doctors specializing in gastroenterology and hepatology evaluate and treat colon polyps at Mayo Clinic. If you have Crohn's disease or another medical condition, Mayo Clinic specialists will collaborate with your primary care doctor to form the best treatment plan.

Having all this expertise in a single place means that your care is discussed among the team, test results are available quickly, appointments are scheduled in coordination and the most highly specialized experts in the world are all working together for your health.

Experience and expertise

Each year, Mayo Clinic doctors treat more than 2,300 people for colon polyps. Mayo Clinic specialists have experience treating people with rare hereditary polyp disorders, including Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and its variations (attenuated FAP, Gardner's syndrome and MAP), juvenile polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Cowden's disease, and Cronkhite-Canada syndrome.

Efficient care

At Mayo Clinic, colon polyps are usually removed when they are found or later that day, sparing you an extra trip to the clinic and another round of bowel preparation.

Aug. 18, 2017
References
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  3. Colon polyps. American College of Gastroenterology. http://patients.gi.org/topics/colon-polyps/. Accessed March 18, 2017.
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