Preparing for your appointment

If you or your child develops signs and symptoms common to coarctation of the aorta, call your doctor. After an initial exam, it's likely that the doctor will refer you or your child to a doctor trained in the diagnosis and treatment of heart conditions (cardiologist).

Here's some information to help you prepare for your appointment, and what to expect from your doctor.

What you can do

  • Write down any signs and symptoms you or your child has had, and for how long.
  • Write down key medical information, including any other health conditions and the names of any medications you or your child is taking.
  • Find a family member or friend who can come with you to the appointment, if possible. Someone who accompanies you can help remember what the doctor says.
  • Write down the questions you want to be sure to ask your doctor.

Questions to ask the doctor at the initial appointment include:

  • What is likely causing these symptoms?
  • Are there any other possible causes for these symptoms?
  • What tests are needed?
  • Should a specialist be consulted?

Questions to ask if you're referred to a cardiologist include:

  • Do I or does my child have coarctation of the aorta?
  • How severe is the defect?
  • Did tests reveal any other heart defects?
  • What is the risk of complications from coarctation of the aorta?
  • What treatment approach do you recommend?
  • If you're recommending medications, what are the possible side effects?
  • If you're recommending surgery, what type of procedure is most likely to be effective? Why?
  • What will be involved in recovery and rehabilitation after surgery?
  • How often should my child or I be seen for follow-up exams and tests?
  • What signs and symptoms should I watch for at home?
  • What is the long-term outlook for this condition?
  • Do you recommend any dietary or activity restrictions?
  • Do you recommend taking antibiotics before dental appointments or other medical procedures?
  • Is it safe for a woman with coarctation of the aorta to become pregnant?
  • What is the risk that my or my child's future children will have this defect?
  • Should I meet with a genetic counselor?

In addition to the questions that you've prepared to ask your doctor, don't hesitate to ask questions during your appointment at any time if you don't understand something.

What to expect from your doctor

A doctor who sees you or your child for possible coarctation of the aorta might ask a number of questions.

If you're the person affected:

  • What are your symptoms?
  • When did you first begin experiencing symptoms?
  • Have your symptoms gotten worse over time?
  • Do your symptoms include shortness of breath?
  • Do your symptoms include headache or dizziness?
  • Do your symptoms include chest pain?
  • Do your symptoms include cold feet?
  • Have you had any weakness or leg cramps with exercise?
  • Have you ever fainted?
  • Do you have frequent nosebleeds?
  • Does exercise or physical exertion make your symptoms worse?
  • Have you been diagnosed with any other medical conditions?
  • What medications are you currently taking, including over-the-counter and prescription drugs, as well as vitamins and supplements?
  • Are you aware of any history of heart problems in your family?
  • Do you or did you smoke? How much?
  • Do you have any children?
  • Are you planning to become pregnant in the future?

If your baby or child is affected:

  • What are your child's symptoms?
  • When did you first notice these symptoms?
  • Is your child gaining weight at a normal rate?
  • Does your child have any breathing problems, such as running out of breath easily or breathing rapidly?
  • Does your child tire easily?
  • Does your child sweat heavily?
  • Does your child seem irritable?
  • Do your child's symptoms include chest pain?
  • Do your child's symptoms include cold feet?
  • Has your child been diagnosed with any other medical conditions?
  • Is your child currently taking any medications?
  • Are you aware of any history of heart problems in your child's family?
  • Is there a history of congenital heart defects in your child's family?
June 15, 2017
References
  1. Coarctation of the aorta. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/CongenitalHeartDefects/AboutCongenitalHeartDefects/Coarctation-of-the-Aorta-CoA_UCM_307022_Article.jsp#.WLiMOBiZOu4. Accessed March 2, 2017.
  2. Agarwala BN, et al. Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of coarctation of the aorta. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 2, 2017.
  3. Singh S, et al. Hypoplasia, pseudocoarctation and coarctation of the aorta — A systematic review. Heart, Lung and Circulation. 2015;24:110.
  4. AskMayoExpert. Coarctation of the aorta: Signs and symptoms. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  5. Goldman L, et al., eds. Congenital heart disease in adults. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 2, 2017.
  6. AskMayoExpert. Coarctation of the aorta: Physical examination. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  7. Suradi H, et al. Current management of coarctation of the aorta. Global Cardiology Science and Practice. 2015;2015:44.
  8. Hay WW, et al., eds. Cardiovascular diseases. In: Current Diagnosis & Treatment: Pediatrics. 23rd ed. New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill Education; 2016. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed March 2, 2017.
  9. Kliegman RM, et al. Acyanotic congenital heart disease: Obstructive lesions. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 2, 2017.
  10. What are congenital heart defects? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/chd. Accessed March 2, 2017.
  11. AskMayoExpert. Coarctation of the aorta: Imaging tests. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  12. AskMayoExpert. Coarctation of the aorta: Surgical or percutaneous treatment. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  13. Warnes CA. Adult congenital heart disease: The challenges of a lifetime. European Heart Journal. 2016;0:1.
  14. Agarwala BN, et al. Management of coarctation of the aorta. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 12, 2017.
  15. Brown ML, et al. Coarctation of the aorta: Lifelong surveillance is mandatory following surgical repair. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2013;62:1020.
  16. Taggart NW, et al. Immediate outcomes of covered stent placement for treatment or prevention of aortic wall injury associated with coarctation of the aorta (COAST II). JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions. 2016;9:484.
  17. Warnes CA, et al. ACC/AHA 2008 guidelines for the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Executive summary. Circulation. 2008;118:2395.
  18. AskMayoExpert. Coarctation of the aorta: Clinical follow-up. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  19. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 10, 2017.
  20. O'Brien P, et al. Coarctation of the aorta. Circulation. 2015;131:e363.

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