Because your newborn's bones, joints and tendons are very flexible, treatment for clubfoot usually begins in the first week or two after birth. The goal of treatment is to improve the way your child's foot looks and works before he or she learns to walk, in hopes of preventing long-term disabilities.

Treatment options include:

  • Stretching and casting (Ponseti method)
  • Surgery

Stretching and casting (Ponseti method)

This is the most common treatment for clubfoot. Your doctor will:

  • Move your baby's foot into a correct position and then place it in a cast to hold it there
  • Reposition and recast your baby's foot once or twice a week for several months
  • Perform a minor surgical procedure to lengthen the Achilles tendon (percutaneous Achilles tenotomy) toward the end of this process

After the shape of your baby's foot is realigned, you'll need to maintain it by doing one or more of the following:

  • Doing stretching exercises with your baby
  • Putting your child in special shoes and braces
  • Making sure your child wears the shoes and braces as long as needed — usually full time for three months, and then at night for up to three years

For this method to be successful, you'll need to apply the braces according to your doctor's directions so that the foot doesn't return to its original position. The main reason this procedure sometimes doesn't work is because the braces are not used constantly.


If your baby's clubfoot is severe or doesn't respond to nonsurgical treatments, more invasive surgery may be needed. An orthopedic surgeon can lengthen tendons to help ease the foot into a better position. After surgery, your child will be in a cast for up to two months, and then need to wear a brace for a year or so to prevent the clubfoot from coming back.

Even with treatment, clubfoot may not be totally correctable. But in most cases babies who are treated early grow up to wear ordinary shoes and lead normal, active lives.

March 23, 2016
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