Cirrhosis care at Mayo Clinic

Your Mayo Clinic care team

Mayo Clinic has more than 100 digestive disease specialists (gastroenterologists) on staff, one of the largest such groups in the world. Because of the complexity of digestive diseases, the specialty is divided into nine groups.

Advanced diagnosis and treatment

  • State-of-the-art imaging developed at Mayo Clinic helps Mayo specialists find liver disease early.
  • Mayo Clinic specialists are working to improve treatment of cirrhosis. People being treated at Mayo Clinic are among the first to benefit from new findings made at Mayo.

The Mayo Clinic experience and patient stories

Our patients tell us that the quality of their interactions, our attention to detail and the efficiency of their visits mean health care like they've never experienced. See the stories of satisfied Mayo Clinic patients.

Expertise and rankings

Mayo Clinic doctors have expertise and experience in evaluating and treating people who have cirrhosis. Doctors treat more than 6,500 people each year who have cirrhosis.

Mayo Clinic researchers developed the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) now used nationwide to assess people's disease progression and allocate organs for transplant.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for digestive disorders in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for digestive disorders by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic also ranks among the Best Children's Hospitals for digestive disorders.

Locations, travel and lodging

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Costs and insurance

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people.

In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

Learn more about appointments at Mayo Clinic.

Please contact your insurance company to verify medical coverage and to obtain any needed authorization prior to your visit. Often, your insurer's customer service number is printed on the back of your insurance card.

Aug. 19, 2017
References
  1. Sanchez W, et al. Liver cirrhosis. The American College of Gastroenterology. http://patients.gi.org/topics/liver-cirrhosis. Accessed Dec. 26, 2015.
  2. Ferri FF. Cirrhosis. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Dec. 26, 2015.
  3. Cirrhosis. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/liver-disease/cirrhosis/Pages/facts.aspx. Accessed Dec. 27, 2015.
  4. Boyer TD, et al., eds. Hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis. In: Zakim & Boyer's Hepatology: A Textbook of Liver Disease. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2012. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Dec. 26, 2015.
  5. Tsochatzis EA, et al. Liver cirrhosis. The Lancet. 2014; 383:1749.
  6. Feldman M, et al. Overview of Cirrhosis. In: Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Oct. 8, 2015.
  7. Singal AK, et al. Model for end-stage liver disease. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology. 2013;3:50.
  8. Toshikuni N, et al. Nutrition and exercise in the management of liver cirrhosis. World Journal of Gastroenterology. 2014;20:7286.
  9. Cook AJ. AllScripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Sept. 22, 2015.
  10. Goldberg E, et al. Cirrhosis in adults: Etiologies, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 27, 2015.
  11. De Robertis R, et al. Noninvasive diagnosis of cirrhosis: A review of different imaging modalities. World Journal of Gastroenterology. 2014;20:7231.
  12. Czaja AJ. Hepatic inflammation and progressive liver fibrosis in chronic liver disease. World Journal of Gastroenterology. 2014;20:2515.
  13. Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). American Liver Foundation. http://www.liverfoundation.org/abouttheliver/info/pbc/. Accessed Dec. 27, 2015.
  14. Liver transplant. American Liver Foundation. http://www.liverfoundation.org/abouttheliver/info/transplant/. Accessed Dec. 27, 2015.
  15. Rakel D. Chronic hepatitis. In: Integrative Medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2012. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Dec. 7, 2015.
  16. Hepatitis C: A focus on dietary supplements. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/hepatitisc/hepatitiscfacts.htm. Accessed Dec. 27, 2015.
  17. U.S. News best hospitals 2013-2014. U.S. News & World Report. http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/rankings/gastroenterology-and-gi-surgery. Accessed Dec. 27, 2015.
  18. Singh S, et al. Liver stiffness is associated with risk of decompensation, liver cancer, and death in patients with chronic liver diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2013;11:1573.
  19. Picco MF (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Fla. Jan. 10, 2016.
  20. Keaveny AP (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Fla. March 15, 2016.