Diagnosis

Your doctor will do a physical exam and ask you a number of questions to try to understand what might be causing your signs and symptoms. He or she may also ask you to keep a diary to keep track of:

  • Your activities
  • Any medications, herbal remedies or supplements you take
  • What you eat and drink
  • Where hives appear and how long it takes a welt to fade
  • Whether your hives come with painful swelling

If your physical exam and medical history suggest your hives are caused by an underlying problem, your doctor may have you undergo testing, such as blood tests or skin tests.

July 06, 2017
References
  1. Hives. American Academy of Dermatology. http://www.aad.org/dermatology-a-to-z/diseases-and-treatments/e---h/hives. Accessed April 25, 2017.
  2. Hives (urticaria). American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. http://www.acaai.org/allergist/allergies/Types/skin-allergies/hives/Pages/default.aspx. Accessed April 25, 2017.
  3. Khan DA. Chronic urticaria: Standard management and patient education. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 25, 2017.
  4. Goldsmith LA, et al., eds. Urticaria and angioedema. In: Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. 8th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2012. http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com. Accessed April 25, 2017.
  5. Khan DA. Chronic urticaria: Treatment of refractory symptoms. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 25, 2017.
  6. Bernstein JA, et al., eds. The diagnosis and management of acute and chronic urticarial: 2014 update. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2014;133:1270.
  7. Darlenski R, et al. Chronic urticaria as a systemic disease. Clinics in Dermatology. 2014;32:420.
  8. Casale TB. Omalizumab for chronic urticaria. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice. 2014;2:118.