Research

Doctors trained in immune system disorders (immunologists), geneticists and other specialized sciences conduct basic and clinical research in potential diagnostic tests and treatments for chronic granulomatous disease. Their work includes refining stem cell transplantation and developing gene therapy for the disease. Staff members in the Primary Immunodeficiency Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, conduct research in chronic granulomatous disease and other primary immunodeficiency conditions.

Publications

See a list of publications on chronic granulomatous disease by Mayo Clinic doctors on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

July 08, 2017
References
  1. Rosenzweig SD, et al. Chronic granulomatous disease: Pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan.18, 2017.
  2. National Library of Medicine. Chronic granulomatous disease. Genetics Home Reference. https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/chronic-granulomatous-disease?_ga=1.168947753.905232672.1468720729. Accessed Jan. 18, 2017.
  3. Chronic granulomatous disease. National Organization for Rare Disorders. https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/chronic-granulomatous-disease/. Accessed Jan. 18, 2017.
  4. Rosenzweig SD, et al. Chronic granulomatous disease: Treatment and prognosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 18, 2017.
  5. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/immunology-allergic-disorders/immunodeficiency-disorders/chronic-granulomatous-disease-cgd. Accessed Jan. 18, 2017.
  6. Brown A. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Dec. 8, 2016.