Self-management

Lifestyle and home remedies

You and your family can work with your child at home to improve his or her speech and language skills. Home practice, in addition to your child's speech therapy sessions, may help your child's progress.

Encourage and support your child as he or she practices speech and language skills. Your support can help your child feel that he or she is doing well and improving.

If your child is participating in physical or occupational therapy, as well as speech therapy, schedule different types of therapy at various times so that your child doesn't become too tired from therapy.

Coping and support

It can be difficult to have a child who has problems communicating. There are a number of support groups available for parents of children with childhood apraxia of speech. Support groups may offer a place for you to find people who understand your situation and who can share similar experiences.

To learn about support groups in your area, see the Apraxia-KIDS website.

Prevention

Diagnosing and treating childhood apraxia of speech at an early stage may reduce the risk of long-term persistence of the problem. If your child experiences speech problems, it's a good idea to have a speech-language pathologist evaluate your child as soon as you notice any speech problems.

April 30, 2016
References
  1. Daroff RB, et al. Dysarthria and apraxia of speech. In: Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2012. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 7, 2016.
  2. Carter J, et al. Etiology of speech and language disorders in children. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 7, 2016.
  3. Childhood apraxia of speech. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. http://www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/ChildhoodApraxia/. Accessed Feb. 7, 2016.
  4. Apraxia of speech. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/voice/pages/apraxia.aspx. Accessed Feb. 7, 2016.
  5. Technical report: Childhood apraxia of speech. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. http://www.asha.org/policy/TR2007-00278.htm. Accessed Feb. 7, 2016.
  6. Overby M, et al. Volubility, consonant, and syllable characteristics in infants and toddlers later diagnosed with childhood apraxia of speech: A pilot study. Journal of Communication Disorders. 2015;55:44.
  7. Treatment approaches for children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). The Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America (CASANA). http://www.apraxia-kids.org/apraxia-information-downloads/. Accessed Feb. 8, 2016.
  8. About childhood apraxia of speech. The Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America (CASANA). http://www.apraxia-kids.org/apraxia-information-downloads/. Accessed Feb. 8, 2016.
  9. Speech sound disorders: Articulation and phonological processes. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. http://www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/SpeechSoundDisorders/. Accessed Feb. 9, 2016.
  10. Dysarthria. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. http://www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/dysarthria/. Accessed Feb. 9, 2016.
  11. Lee ASY, et al. Non-speech oral motor treatment for children with developmental speech sound disorders. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD009383.pub2/abstract. Accessed Feb. 7, 2016.
  12. Childhood apraxia of speech: Screening. -http://www.asha.org/PRPSpecificTopic.aspx?folderid=8589935338&section=Assessment#Screening. Accessed Feb. 9, 2016.
  13. Riggin ER. EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 19, 2016.