Research

Mayo Clinic is a leading center for research on celiac disease. Mayo researchers are working to improve methods of diagnosis and treatment. These include the role of genetics in predicting celiac disease, environmental factors that can trigger the disease, new treatments for refractory celiac disease, the development of animal models, and the skin rash associated with celiac disease (dermatitis herpetiformis).

Researchers in the Department of Gastroenterology, in collaboration with the Department of Immunology, are exploring the role of the immune system in celiac disease, as well as the role of the microbiome and our bacterial environment. They also are examining triggers for celiac disease. The intent is to identify the factors that have led to the dramatic increase in celiac disease and, if these are environmental, to see if they can be altered.

Researchers are engaged in clinical trials to address novel therapies for both celiac disease and refractory celiac disease.

Researchers in gastroenterology work together with others in dermatology, immunology, pathology, pediatrics, epidemiology and biostatistics, as well as the Mayo Comprehensive Clinical Cancer Center and the Center for Cell Signaling in Gastroenterology.

Publications

See a list of publications by Mayo Clinic doctors on celiac disease on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

Research Profiles

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Aug. 17, 2016
References
  1. Ludvigsson JF, et al. The Oslo definitions for coeliac disease and related terms. Gut. 2013;62:43.
  2. Ludvigsson JF, et al. Diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease: Guidelines from the British Society of Gastroenterology. Gut. 2014;63:1210.
  3. Celiac disease. National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse. http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/digestive-diseases/celiac-disease/Pages/facts.aspx. Accessed Feb. 5, 2016.
  4. Ferri FF. Celiac disease. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 4, 2016.
  5. Kliegman RM, et al. Disorders of malabsorption. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 4, 2016.
  6. Green PHR, et al. Celiac disease. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2015;35:1099.
  7. Feldman M, et al. Celiac disease. In: Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 4, 2016.
  8. Catassi C, et al. World Perspective and Celiac Disease Epidemiology. Digestive Diseases. 2015;33:141.
  9. Snyder MR, et al. Celiac disease: Advances in diagnosis. Expert Review of Clinical Immunology. 2016;12:449.
  10. Cook AJ. AllScripts EPSi. Rochester, Minn. Feb. 8, 2016.
  11. McCarville JL, et al. Pharmacological approaches in celiac disease. Current Opinion in Pharmacology. 2015;25:7.
  12. U.S. News best hospitals 2015-2016. U.S. News & World Report. http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/rankings/gastroenterology-and-gi-surgery. Accessed April 6, 2016.
  13. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Celiac disease. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2007.
  14. Celiac disease. Natural Medicines. https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/. Accessed April 7, 2016.
  15. Rishi AR, et al. Refractory celiac disease. Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2016;10:537.
  16. AskMayoExpert. Human Leukocyte Antigen Testing (Adult). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  17. Murray JA (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 21, 2016.