Preparing for your appointment

You may be referred to a doctor who treats digestive diseases (gastroenterologist).

Here's some information to help you prepare for your appointment and know what to expect from your doctor.

What can you do

  • Continue eating a normal diet. If you stop or reduce eating gluten before you're tested for celiac disease, you may change the test results.
  • Write down your symptoms. Include when they started and how they may have changed over time.
  • Write down key personal information. Include any major stresses or recent life changes.
  • Make a list of all medications. Include vitamins or supplements that you're taking.
  • Write down questions to ask your doctor.

Questions to ask your doctor

Some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What's the most likely cause of my symptoms?
  • Is my condition temporary or long term?
  • What kinds of tests do I need?
  • What treatments can help?
  • Are there any dietary restrictions that I need to follow?
  • How will I learn which foods contain gluten? Should I see a dietitian?
  • If I have celiac disease, will you also test for other conditions such as vitamin or mineral deficiencies, osteoporosis or diabetes?

Don't hesitate to ask other questions during your appointment.

What to expect from your doctor

Be ready to answer questions your doctor may ask:

  • When did you first begin experiencing symptoms, and how severe are they?
  • Have your symptoms been continuous or occasional?
  • What, if anything, seems to improve your symptoms?
  • What, if anything, seems to worsen your symptoms?
  • What medications and pain relievers do you take?
  • Does anyone in your family have celiac disease?
  • Do you or does anyone in your family have an autoimmune disorder?
  • Have you had any blistering or itchy skin rashes with your symptoms?
  • Have you ever been diagnosed with anemia or osteoporosis?
Aug. 17, 2016
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