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June 18, 2016
  1. Clostridium difficile-induced diarrhea. Merck Manual Professional Version.–induced-diarrhea. Accessed Feb. 5, 2016.
  2. Longo DL, et al., eds. Clostridium difficile infection, including pseudomembranous colitis. In: Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 19th ed. New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill Education; 2015. Accessed Feb. 5, 2016.
  3. Cammarota G, et al. Fecal microbiota transplantation for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection: A systematic review. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. 2014;48:693.
  4. Waltz P, et al. Novel therapies for severe Clostridium difficile colitis. Current Opinion in Critical Care. In press. Accessed Feb. 8, 2016.
  5. Malani PN, et al. Expanded evidence for frozen fecal microbiota transplantation for Clostridium difficile infection: A fresh take. JAMA. 2016;315:137.
  6. LaMont JT. Clostridium difficile in adults: Epidemiology, microbiology, and pathophysiology. Accessed Feb. 8, 2016.
  7. Kelly CP, et al. Clostridium difficile in adults: Treatment. Accessed Feb. 8, 2016.
  8. Frequently asked questions about Clostridium difficile for healthcare providers. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed Feb. 8, 2016.
  9. LaMont JT. Clostridium difficile in adults: Clinical manifestations and diagnosis. Accessed Feb. 8, 2016.
  10. Surawicz CM, et al. Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Clostridium difficile infections. The American Journal of Gastroenterology. 2013;108:478.
  11. Davidson LE, et al. Clostridium difficile and probiotics. Accessed Feb. 9, 2016.
  12. Khanna S (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Feb. 16, 2016.