Overview

A broken wrist or broken hand is a break or crack in one or more of the bones of your wrist or hand. The most common of these injuries occurs in the wrist when people try to catch themselves during a fall and land hard on an outstretched hand.

Risk factors for a broken wrist or broken hand range from participation in certain sports — such as in-line skating or snowboarding — to having a condition in which bones become thinner and more fragile (osteoporosis).

It's important to treat a broken (fractured) wrist or hand as soon as possible. Otherwise, the bones might not heal in proper alignment, which might affect your ability to do everyday activities, such as writing or buttoning a shirt. Early treatment will also help minimize pain and stiffness.

July 12, 2017
References
  1. Wrist fractures. American Society for Surgery of the Hand. http://www.assh.org/handcare/hand-arm-injuries/wrist-fractures. Accessed April 20, 2017
  2. Sebastin S, et al. Overview of finger, hand, and wrist fractures. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 20, 2017.
  3. Scaphoid fracture of the wrist. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00012. Accessed April 20, 2017.
  4. Williams AA, et al. Pediatric hand and wrist injuries. Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine. 2013;6:18.
  5. Petron DJ. Distal radius fractures in adults. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 20, 2017.
  6. Bone health. National Institute for Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Bone_Health/default.asp. Accessed April 21, 2017.
  7. Pountos I, et al. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect bone healing? A critical analysis. The Scientific World Journal. 2012;2012:606404. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/tswj/2012/606404/. Accessed May 22, 2017.