Lifestyle and home remedies

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Even though there is little research to show the effectiveness of these self-care remedies, some may be worth a try:

  • Use hot or cold compresses on your breasts.
  • Wear a firm support bra, fitted by a professional if possible.
  • Wear a sports bra during exercise, especially when your breasts may be more sensitive.
  • Experiment with relaxation therapy, which can help control the high levels of anxiety associated with severe breast pain.
  • Limit or eliminate caffeine, a dietary change some women find helpful, although medical studies of caffeine's effect on breast pain and other premenstrual symptoms have been inconclusive.
  • Follow a low-fat diet and eat more complex carbohydrates, a strategy that's helped some women with breast pain in observational studies.
  • Consider using an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) — but ask your doctor how much to take, as long-term use may increase your risk of liver problems and other side effects.
  • Keep a journal, noting when you experience breast pain and other symptoms, to determine if your pain is cyclic or noncyclic.
Jan. 16, 2013