Medulloblastoma

Overview

Medulloblastoma is the most common cancerous brain tumor in children, accounting for nearly 1 in 5 of all pediatric brain tumors.

It almost always starts in the lower back part of the brain, called the cerebellum, and tends to spread through spinal fluid. Medulloblastoma rarely spreads beyond the brain and spinal cord.

Treatment for medulloblastoma usually consists of a combination of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy.

About three-fourths of children with medulloblastoma treated with this combined approach survive into adulthood. Survival depends on many factors, including age of diagnosis as well as the size, type, location and growth rate of the tumor.

Therapies for medulloblastoma may cause delayed complications that can affect quality of life after treatment.

Clinical trials and ongoing research are currently looking at ways to reduce those side effects of therapy while effectively treating the disease.

June 27, 2017
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