Preparing for your appointment

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Brain aneurysms are most often detected after they've ruptured and become medical emergencies. However, a brain aneurysm may be detected when you've undergone head-imaging tests for another condition.

If such test results indicate you have a brain aneurysm, you'll need to discuss the results with a specialist in brain and nervous system disorders (neurologist or neurosurgeon).

To make the best use of your time with your doctor, you may want to prepare a list of questions, such as:

  • What do you know about the size and location of the aneurysm?
  • Do the imaging test results provide evidence of how likely it is to rupture?
  • What treatment do you recommend at this time?
  • If we wait, how often will I need to have follow-up tests?
  • What steps can I take to lower the risk of an aneurysm rupturing?

Your neurologist or neurosurgeon may ask you the following questions to help determine the best course of action:

  • Do you smoke?
  • How much do you drink?
  • Do you use recreational drugs?
  • Are you being treated for high blood pressure, high cholesterol or other conditions that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease?
  • Do you take your medications as prescribed by your doctor?
  • Is there a history of brain aneurysms in your family?
May. 24, 2011