Self-management

Coping and support

A cancer diagnosis can be overwhelming. With time you'll find ways to cope with the distress and uncertainty of cancer. Until then, you may find it helps to:

  • Learn enough about bone cancer to make decisions about your care. Ask your doctor about your bone cancer, including your treatment options and, if you like, your prognosis. As you learn more about bone cancer, you may become more confident in making treatment decisions.
  • Keep friends and family close. Keeping your close relationships strong will help you deal with your bone cancer. Friends and family can provide the practical support you'll need, such as helping take care of your house if you're in the hospital. And they can serve as emotional support when you feel overwhelmed by cancer.
  • Find someone to talk with. Find a good listener who is willing to listen to you talk about your hopes and fears. This may be a friend or family member. The concern and understanding of a counselor, medical social worker, clergy member or cancer support group also may be helpful. Ask your doctor about support groups in your area. Or check your phone book, library or a cancer organization, such as the National Cancer Institute or the American Cancer Society.
Mar. 17, 2015
References
  1. Bone cancer: Questions and answers. National Cancer Institute. http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Sites-Types/bone. Accessed Dec. 20, 2014.
  2. Bone cancer. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed Dec. 20, 2014.
  3. Cancer Facts & Figures 2015. American Cancer Society. http://www.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/cancerfactsfigures2015/index. Accessed Jan. 6, 2015.
  4. Niederhuber, JE, et al., eds. Sarcomas of Bone. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Dec. 20, 2014.
  5. Miller HL. Decision Support System. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 8, 2015.
  6. Gupta SK, et al. Principles of rotationplasty. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2012;20:657.
  7. So NF, et al. Prosthetic fitting after rotationplasty of the knee. American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2014;93:328.
  8. Rose PS (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 11, 2015.
  9. Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Rochester, Minn. National Cancer Institute. http://www.cancer.gov/researchandfunding/extramural/cancercenters/find-a-cancer-center/mayoclinic. Accessed Jan. 6, 2015.
  10. Hornicek FJ. Bone sarcoma: Preoperative evaluation, histologic classifications and principles of surgical management. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 7, 2014.
  11. Ness KK, et al. A comparison of function after limb salvage with non-invasive expandable or modular prostheses in children. European Journal of Cancer. 2014;50:3212.
  12. Beauchamp CP (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz. Jan. 22, 2015.
  13. Pagnano MW (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 22, 2015.
  14. Larson AN (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester Minn. Feb. 10, 2015.

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