Preparing for your appointment

You're likely to start by seeing your family doctor or primary care provider. Or you might be referred to a doctor who specializes in urinary tract disorders (urologist).

Here's some information to help you prepare for your appointment.

What you can do

Make a list of:

  • Your symptoms, including any that may seem unrelated to the reason for which you scheduled the appointment, and when they began
  • Key medical information, including other conditions for which you're being treated, and whether bladder or kidney diseases run in your family
  • All medications, vitamins or other supplements you take, including doses
  • Questions to ask your doctor

For hematuria, some questions to ask include:

  • What are the possible causes of my symptoms?
  • What tests do I need?
  • Is my condition likely temporary?
  • What treatments are available?
  • I have other health issues. How can I best manage them together?
  • Are there brochures or other printed material that I can have? What websites do you recommend?

Don't hesitate to ask other questions.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you questions, such as:

  • Do you have pain when you urinate?
  • Do you see blood in your urine only sometimes or all the time?
  • When do you see blood in your urine — when you start urinating, toward the end of your urine stream or the entire time you're urinating?
  • Are you also passing blood clots during urination? What size and shape are they?
  • Do you smoke?
  • Are you exposed to chemicals on the job? What kinds?
  • Have you had radiation therapy?
Aug. 17, 2017
References
  1. Kurtz M, et al. Etiology and evaluation of hematuria in adults. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed June 13, 2017.
  2. Hematuria (Blood in the urine). National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/urologic-diseases/hematuria-blood-urine. Accessed June 13, 2017.
  3. Hematuria in adults. National Kidney Foundation. https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/hematuria-adults. Accessed June 13, 2017.
  4. Isolated hematuria. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/genitourinary-disorders/symptoms-of-genitourinary-disorders/isolated-hematuria. Accessed June 13, 2017.
  5. Medical student curriculum: Hematuria. American Urological Association. http://www.auanet.org/education/educational-programs/medical-student-education/medical-student-curriculum/hematuria. Accessed June 13, 2017.
  6. Mercieri A. Exercise-induced hematuria. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed June 13, 2017.
  7. Wein AJ, et al., eds. Evaluation of the urologic patient: History, physical examination, and urinalysis. In: Campbell-Walsh Urology. 11th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 10, 2017.