Diagnosis

To diagnose binge-eating disorder, your doctor may recommend a psychological evaluation, including discussion of your eating habits.

Your doctor also may want you to have other tests to check for health consequences of binge-eating disorder, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, heart problems, diabetes, GERD, and some sleep-related breathing disorders. These tests may include:

  • A physical exam
  • Blood and urine tests
  • A sleep disorder center consultation

Criteria for diagnosis

For a diagnosis of binge-eating disorder, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), published by the American Psychiatric Association, lists these points:

  • Recurrent episodes of eating an abnormally large amount of food
  • Feeling a lack of control during bingeing, such as how much you're eating and whether you can stop eating
  • Binge eating that's associated with at least three of these factors: eating rapidly; eating until you're uncomfortably full; eating large amounts when you're not hungry; eating alone out of embarrassment; or feeling disgusted, depressed or guilty after eating
  • Concern about your binge eating
  • Binge eating at least once a week for at least three months
  • Binge eating that's not associated with purging, such as self-induced vomiting, or other compensating behaviors to lose weight, such as excessive exercise or laxative use
Feb. 09, 2016
References
  1. Binge eating disorder. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/binge.htm. Accessed Feb. 28, 2015.
  2. Binge-eating disorder. In: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-5. 5th ed. Arlington, Va.: American Psychiatric Association; 2013. http://www.psychiatryonline.org. Accessed March 2, 2015.
  3. Vyvanse (prescribing information). Wayne, Pa.: Shire US, Inc.; 2015. http://www.vyvanse.com/. Accessed Feb. 27, 2015.
  4. Rohren CH (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. March 11, 2015.
  5. Grothe K (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. March 26, 2015.
  6. Sim LA, et al. Identification and treatment of eating disorders in the primary care setting. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2010;85:746.
  7. Binge eating disorder. The Merck Manual Professional Edition. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/psychiatric_disorders/eating_disorders/binge_eating_disorder.html. Accessed Feb. 28, 2015.
  8. Sysko R, et al. Binge eating disorder in adults: Overview of treatment. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 2, 2015.
  9. Hall-Flavin DK (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 6, 2015.
  10. Goracci A, et al. Pharmacotherapy of binge-eating disorder: A review. Journal of Addiction Medicine. 2015;9:1.
  11. Jasik CB. Body image and health: Eating disorders and obesity. Primary Care. 2014;4:519.
  12. Eating disorders: Advice for parents. NHS Choice. http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/eatingdisorders/Pages/eating-disorders-advice-parents.aspx. Accessed March 2, 2015.
  13. McElroy SL, et al. Efficacy and safety of lisdexamfetamine for treatment of adults with moderate to severe binge-eating disorder: A randomized clinical trial. JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72:235.
  14. Winham SJ, et al. Bipolar disorder with comorbid binge eating history: A genome-wide association study implicates APOB. Journal of Affective Disorders. 2014;165:151.
  15. Breuner CC. Complementary, holistic, and integrative medicine: Eating disorders. Pediatrics in Review. 2010;31:e75.