Overview

Bee stings are a common outdoor nuisance. In most cases, bee stings are just annoying, and home treatment is all that's necessary to ease the pain of bee stings. But if you're allergic to bee stings or you get stung numerous times, you may have a more-serious reaction that requires emergency treatment.

You can take several steps to avoid bee stings — as well as hornet and wasp stings — and find out how to treat them if you do get stung.

Oct. 04, 2016
References
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  4. Bites and stings. American College of Emergency Physicians. http://www.emergencycareforyou.org/Emergency-101/Emergencies-A-Z/Bites-and-Stings/. Accessed July 18, 2016.
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