Diagnosis

Your doctor will look closely at your skin to determine whether you have a pressure ulcer and how bad the damage is. He or she will try to assign a stage to the wound. Staging helps determine what treatment is best for you. He or she might also order a blood test to assess your general health.

Questions from the doctor

Your doctor might ask questions such as:

  • When did the pressure sore first appear?
  • What is the degree of pain?
  • Have you had pressure sores in the past?
  • How were they managed, and what was the outcome of treatment?
  • What kind of care assistance is available to you?
  • What is your routine for changing positions?
  • What medical conditions have you been diagnosed with, and what is your current treatment?
  • What is your normal daily diet and fluid intake?
April 25, 2017
References
  1. Pressure ulcers. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merck.com/mmpe/sec10/ch126/ch126a.html. Accessed Dec. 16, 2016.
  2. Berlowitz D. Clinical staging and management of pressure-induced injury. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 16, 2016.
  3. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. How to prevent pressure ulcers. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2013.
  4. AskMayoExpert. Skin ulcers. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  5. Ferri FF. Pressure ulcers. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Dec. 16, 2016.
  6. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. How to manage pressure ulcers. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2013.
  7. Berlowitz D. Prevention of pressure ulcers. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 16, 2016.
  8. Tleyjeh I, et al. Infectious complications of pressure ulcers. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 16, 2016.
  9. Lebwohl MG, et al. Superficial and deep ulcers. In: Treatment of Skin Disease: Comprehensive Therapeutic Strategies. 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Dec. 16, 2016.
  10. National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) announces a change in terminology from pressure ulcer to pressure injury and updates the stages of pressure injury. News release. www.npuap.org. Accessed April 13, 2016.
  11. Raetz J, et al. Common questions about pressure ulcers. American Family Physician. 2015;92:888.
  12. Berlowitz D. Epidemiology, pathogenesis and risk assessment of pressure ulcers. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 16, 2016.
  13. Gibson LE (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Dec. 23, 2016.
  14. Pressure ulcer prevention. Rockville, Md.: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. https://www.guidelines.gov/summaries/summary/43935/pressure-ulcer-prevention-in-evidencebased-geriatric-nursing-protocols-for-best-practice?q=pressure+ulcer+prevention. Accessed Dec. 16, 2016.