Overview

Aortic valve disease is a condition in which the valve between the main pumping chamber of your heart (left ventricle) and the main artery to your body (aorta) doesn't work properly. Aortic valve disease may be a condition present at birth (congenital heart disease), or it may result from other causes.

Types of aortic valve disease include:

Aortic valve stenosis

In this condition, the flaps (cusps) of the aortic valve may become thickened and stiff, or they may fuse together. This causes narrowing of the aortic valve opening. The narrowed valve isn't able to open fully, which reduces or blocks blood flow from your heart into your aorta and the rest of your body.

Aortic valve regurgitation

In this condition, the aortic valve doesn't close properly, causing blood to flow backward into the left ventricle.

Your treatment depends on the type and severity of your aortic valve disease. In some cases you may need surgery to repair or replace the aortic valve.

Aortic valve disease care at Mayo Clinic

March 23, 2017
References
  1. Problem: Aortic valve stenosis. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/More/HeartValveProblemsandDisease/Problem-Aortic-Valve-Stenosis_UCM_450437_Article.jsp#.WCn02cnFjVY. Accessed Oct. 31, 2016.
  2. Problem: Aortic valve regurgitation. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/More/HeartValveProblemsandDisease/Problem-Aortic-Valve-Regurgitation_UCM_450611_Article.jsp#.WCn1DcnFjVY. Accessed Oct. 31, 2016.
  3. What is heart valve disease? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/hvd. Accessed Aug. 15, 2016.
  4. Bonow RO, et al., eds. Valvular heart disease. In: Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 16, 2016.
  5. AskMayoExpert. Aortic valve stenosis (adult). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  6. Nishimura RA, et al. 2014 AHA/ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 2014;148:e1.
  7. Aldea GS. Minimally invasive aortic and mitral valve surgery. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 15, 2016.
  8. Ruiz CE, et al. Transcatheter therapies for the treatment of valvular and paravalvular regurgitation in acquired and congenital valvular heart disease. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2015;66:169.
  9. Getting support. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Caregiver/ReachOut/GettingSupport/Getting-Support_UCM_301847_Article.jsp#.WCn5QdgzXIU.  Accessed Nov. 4, 2016.
  10. Daniels BK. Echo Information Management System. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Oct 18, 2016.
  11. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Aug. 4, 2016.
  12. Clavel MA, et al. The complex nature of discordant severe calcified aortic valve disease grading: New insights from combined Doppler echocardiographic and computed tomographic study. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2013;62:2329.
  13. How can I make my lifestyle healthier? American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/More/ToolsForYourHeartHealth/Answers-by-Heart-Fact-Sheets-Lifestyle-and-Risk-Reduction_UCM_300611_Article.jsp#.WC9socnFjVY. Accessed Nov. 18, 2016.