Diagnosis

If you have one or more episodes of thrombosis or pregnancy loss that aren't explained by known health conditions, your doctor can schedule blood tests to check for abnormal clotting and for the presence of antibodies to phospholipids.

To confirm a diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome, the antibodies must appear in your blood at least twice, in tests conducted 12 or more weeks apart.

Feb. 09, 2017
References
  1. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/aps/. Accessed Nov. 28, 2016.
  2. Erkan D, et al. Clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 28, 2016.
  3. Antiphospholipid syndrome. American College of Rheumatology. http://www.rheumatology.org/I-Am-A/Patient-Caregiver/Diseases-Conditions/Antiphospholipid-Syndrome. Accessed Nov. 28, 2016.
  4. Schur PH, et al. Treatment of the antiphospholipid syndrome. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 28, 2016.
  5. Lockwood CJ, et al. Pregnancy in women with antiphospholipid syndrome. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 28, 2016.
  6. Blood thinner pills: Your guide to using them safely. Rockville, Md.: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. http://www.ahrq.gov/patients-consumers/diagnosis-treatment/treatments/btpills/btpills.html. Accessed Nov. 29, 2016.
  7. Ask Mayo Expert. Warfarin: Dietary recommendations (adult). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  8. Dlott JS, et al. Drug-induced lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies. Current Rheumatology Reports. 2012;14:71.