Anorexia can have numerous complications. At its most severe, it can be fatal. Death may occur suddenly — even when someone is not severely underweight. This may result from abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias) or an imbalance of electrolytes — minerals such as sodium, potassium and calcium that maintain the balance of fluids in your body.

Complications of anorexia include:

  • Death
  • Anemia
  • Heart problems, such as mitral valve prolapse, abnormal heart rhythms and heart failure
  • Bone loss, increasing risk of fractures later in life
  • In females, absence of a period
  • In males, decreased testosterone
  • Gastrointestinal problems, such as constipation, bloating or nausea
  • Electrolyte abnormalities, such as low blood potassium, sodium and chloride
  • Kidney problems

If a person with anorexia becomes severely malnourished, every organ in the body can be damaged, including the brain, heart and kidneys. This damage may not be fully reversible, even when the anorexia is under control.

In addition to the host of physical complications, people with anorexia also commonly have other mental disorders as well. They may include:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety disorders
  • Personality disorders
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorders
  • Drug abuse
Jan. 05, 2012