Treatments and drugs

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Anhidrosis that affects a small part of your body usually isn't a problem and doesn't need treatment. But large areas of decreased perspiration can be life-threatening. Treatments may depend on the condition that's causing the anhidrosis.

Treating heat-related problems

Overheating needs prompt treatment to prevent symptoms from becoming worse.

Heat cramps

To relieve cramping:

  • Rest and cool down
  • Drink cool fruit juice or a sports drink that contains electrolytes
  • Get medical care if cramps become worse or don't go away in about an hour
  • Wait at least several hours before returning to strenuous activity

Heat exhaustion

Act quickly when someone develops signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion, such as nausea, dizziness and a rapid heartbeat:

  • Move the person into a shady or air-conditioned space, and elevate his or her legs slightly.
  • Loosen the person's clothing, and remove any heavy pieces of clothing.
  • Have the person drink a cool beverage that doesn't have caffeine or alcohol.
  • Spray or sponge the person with cool water.
  • If symptoms don't improve quickly, call 911 or emergency medical help.

Heatstroke

Heatstroke requires immediate medical care, so call 911 or emergency medical help. This condition can be fatal if left untreated. Until help arrives:

  • Move the person into a shady or air-conditioned space.
  • Spray or sponge the person with cool water. Or wrap him or her in wet towels or sheets. Use a fan or newspaper to increase air circulation.
  • Have the person drink a cool beverage that doesn't have caffeine or alcohol if he or she is able.
Dec. 13, 2014

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