Treatment

During an anaphylactic attack, you might receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if you stop breathing or your heart stops beating. You might also be given medications, including:

  • Epinephrine (adrenaline) to reduce your body's allergic response
  • Oxygen, to help you breathe
  • Intravenous (IV) antihistamines and cortisone to reduce inflammation of your air passages and improve breathing
  • A beta-agonist (such as albuterol) to relieve breathing symptoms

What to do in an emergency

If you're with someone who's having an allergic reaction and shows signs of shock, act fast. Look for pale, cool and clammy skin; a weak, rapid pulse; trouble breathing; confusion; and loss of consciousness. Do the following immediately:

  • Call 911 or emergency medical help.
  • Use an epinephrine autoinjector, if available, by pressing it into the person's thigh.
  • Make sure the person is lying down and elevate his or her legs.
  • Check the person's pulse and breathing and, if necessary, administer CPR or other first-aid measures.

Using an autoinjector

Many people at risk of anaphylaxis carry an autoinjector. This device is a combined syringe and concealed needle that injects a single dose of medication when pressed against the thigh. Always replace epinephrine before its expiration date, or it might not work properly.

Using an autoinjector immediately can keep anaphylaxis from worsening and could save your life. Be sure you know how to use the autoinjector. Also, make sure the people closest to you know how to use it.

Long-term treatment

If insect stings trigger your anaphylactic reaction, a series of allergy shots (immunotherapy) might reduce your body's allergic response and prevent a severe reaction in the future.

Unfortunately, in most other cases there's no way to treat the underlying immune system condition that can lead to anaphylaxis. But you can take steps to prevent a future attack — and be prepared if one occurs.

  • Try to avoid your allergy triggers.
  • Carry self-administered epinephrine. During an anaphylactic attack, you can give yourself the drug using an autoinjector (EpiPen, others).