Expertise and rankings

Experience

Mayo Clinic neurologists have extensive experience in diagnosing and treating ALS. Each year, our experts see nearly 800 people with ALS.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis can be difficult to diagnose in its early stages because the symptoms are similar to many other disorders, including spinal cord diseases, muscle diseases and neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis, multifocal motor neuropathy, myasthenia gravis, spinal muscular atrophy and stroke. Doctors at Mayo Clinic have experience evaluating people for ALS and other conditions with similar symptoms.

Although ALS can't be cured, Mayo Clinic doctors focus on slowing the progression of your condition, relieving your symptoms, helping you maintain function through rehabilitation and improving your quality of life. The team partners with you and your family to provide care and support.

Nationally recognized expertise

Mayo Clinic campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota are certified Centers of Excellence by the ALS Association.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic's neurology department's expertise and rankings.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for neurology and neurosurgery in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery by U.S. News & World Report.

Sept. 22, 2016
References
  1. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) fact sheet. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/amyotrophiclateralsclerosis/ALS.htm. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  2. Elman LB. Clinical features of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other forms of motor neuron disease. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  3. Maragakis NJ. Epidemiology and pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  4. McCluskey L. Familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  5. Ingre C, et al. Risk factors for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Clinical Epidemiology. 2015;7:181.
  6. Crum BA (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 25, 2016.
  7. Galvez-Jimenez N. Symptom-based management of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  8. Elman LB, et al. Diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other forms of motor neuron disease. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  9. Miller RG, et al. Practice parameter update: The care of the patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Multidisciplinary care, symptom management, and cognitive/behavioral impairment (an evidence-based review): Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology. 2009;73:1227.
  10. Neurological diagnostic tests and procedures. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/misc/diagnostic_tests.htm. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  11. Choudry RB, et al. Disease modifying treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  12. ALS Association chapter support groups. The ALS Association. , http://www.alsa.org/community/support-groups/. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  13. Services in your community. The ALS Association. http://www.alsa.org/community/certified-centers/. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  14. Riggin ER. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. May 10, 2016.