Treatment

There's no cure for amyloidosis. But treatment can help manage signs and symptoms and limit further production of amyloid protein. Specific treatments depend on the type of amyloidosis and target the source of the amyloid production.

  • AL amyloidosis. Many of the same chemotherapy medications that treat multiple myeloma are used in AL amyloidosis to stop the growth of abnormal cells that produce amyloid.

    Autologous blood stem cell transplant (ASCT) offers an additional treatment option in some cases. This procedure involves collecting your own stem cells from your blood and storing them for a short time while you have high-dose chemotherapy. The stem cells are then returned to your body via a vein.

    ASCT is most appropriate for people whose disease isn't advanced and whose heart isn't greatly affected.

  • AA amyloidosis. Treatments target the underlying condition — for example, an anti-inflammatory medication to treat rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Hereditary amyloidosis. Liver transplantation may be an option because the protein that causes this form of amyloidosis is made in the liver.
  • Dialysis-related amyloidosis. Treatments include changing your mode of dialysis or having a kidney transplant.

Supportive care

To manage ongoing signs and symptoms of amyloidosis, your doctor also may recommend:

  • Pain medication
  • Fluid retention medication (diuretic) and a low-salt diet
  • Blood-thinning medication
  • Medication to control your heart rate
July 07, 2017
References
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