Research

Researchers at Mayo Clinic study Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment and other conditions that affect your memory and thinking skills. Researchers study risk factors, predictors, diagnostic techniques and potential treatments for Alzheimer's disease and other conditions.

The Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center is jointly based in Rochester, Minnesota, and Jacksonville, Florida. These facilities are two of 29 Alzheimer's Disease Centers in the United States designated and funded by the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Mayo Clinic is a key participant in the Arizona Alzheimer's Consortium.

You may have the opportunity to participate in clinical trials at Mayo Clinic. Read more about Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's disease research here and here.

Publications

See a list of publications by Mayo Clinic doctors on Alzheimer's disease on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

Related Video

Watch Mayo Clinic neurologist Ronald C. Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., discuss mild cognitive impairment on HBO — The Alzheimer's Project. Also watch Dr. Petersen discuss a Mayo Clinic mild cognitive impairment study and a Mayo Clinic study regarding the most effective methods to predict Alzheimer's disease on YouTube.

Research Profiles

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Dec. 22, 2015
References
  1. Ferri FF. Alzheimer's disease. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 20, 2015.
  2. Alzheimer's disease fact sheet. National Institute on Aging. https://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/publication/alzheimers-disease-fact-sheet. Accessed Sept. 20, 2015.
  3. Grabowski TJ. Clinical features and diagnosis of Alzheimer disease. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 21, 2015.
  4. Longo DL, et al. Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. In: Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 18th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2012. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Sept. 24, 2015.
  5. Goldman L, et al., eds. Alzheimer disease and other dementias. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 20, 2015.
  6. Halter JB, et al. Dementia including Alzheimer's disease. In: Hazzard's Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology. 6th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2009. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Sept. 24, 2015.
  7. Caring for a person with Alzheimer's disease. National Institute on Aging. https://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/publication/caring-person-alzheimers-disease/about-guide. Accessed Sept. 20, 2015.
  8. Keene CD, et al. Epidemiology, pathology, and pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 21, 2015.
  9. Ritter A, et al. Fluid biomarkers in clinical trials of Alzheimer’s disease therapeutics. Frontiers in Neurology. 2015;6:1.
  10. Alternative treatments. Alzheimer's Association. http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_alternative_treatments.asp. Accessed Sept. 20, 2015.
  11. Alzheimer's disease at a glance. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/alzheimer/ataglance. Accessed Sept. 20, 2015.
  12. Press D, et al. Treatment of dementia. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 21, 2015.
  13. Press D, et al. Prevention of dementia. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 21, 2015.
  14. Riggs EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 22, 2015.
  15. Graff Radford, J (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Sept. 29, 2015.
  16. Adopt a healthy diet. Alzheimer's Association. http://www.alz.org/we_can_help_adopt_a_healthy_diet.asp. Accessed Oct. 7, 2015.