Treatment

Allergy treatments include:

  • Allergen avoidance. Your doctor will help you take steps to identify and avoid your allergy triggers. This is generally the most important step in preventing allergic reactions and reducing symptoms.
  • Medications. Depending on your allergy, medications can help reduce your immune system reaction and ease symptoms. Your doctor might suggest over-the-counter or prescription medication in the form of pills or liquid, nasal sprays, or eyedrops.
  • Immunotherapy. For severe allergies or allergies not completely relieved by other treatment, your doctor might recommend allergen immunotherapy. This treatment involves a series of injections of purified allergen extracts, usually given over a period of a few years.

    Another form of immunotherapy is a tablet that's placed under the tongue (sublingual) until it dissolves. Sublingual drugs are used to treat some pollen allergies.

  • Emergency epinephrine. If you have a severe allergy, you might need to carry an emergency epinephrine shot at all times. Given for severe allergic reactions, an epinephrine shot (Auvi-Q, EpiPen, others) can reduce symptoms until you get emergency treatment.

Alternative medicine

Clinical practice guidelines suggest that some people with allergic rhinitis may benefit from acupuncture.

Aug. 07, 2017
References
  1. Allergy overview. Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. http://aafa.org/display.cfm?id=9. Accessed May 28, 2017.
  2. Allergic reactions. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. http://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/library/at-a-glance/allergic-reactions.aspx. Accessed May 28, 2017.
  3. Seidman MD, et al. Clinical practice guideline: Allergic rhinitis. Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery. 2015;152:S1.
  4. Allergies. American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. http://acaai.org/allergies. Accessed May 28, 2017.
  5. Allergies and hay fever. American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery. http://www.entnet.org/content/allergies-and-hay-fever. Accessed May 28, 2017.
  6. Anaphylaxis. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. http://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/allergies/anaphylaxis. Accessed May 28, 2017.
  7. Types of allergies. Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. http://www.aafa.org/page/types-of-allergies.aspx. Accessed May 28, 2017.
  8. Who has allergies? American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. http://acaai.org/allergies/who-has-allergies. Accessed May 28, 2017.
  9. What causes asthma? American Lung Association. http://www.lung.org/lung-health-and-diseases/lung-disease-lookup/asthma/asthma-symptoms-causes-risk-factors/what-causes-asthma.html. Accessed May 28, 2017.
  10. Allergic rhinitis, sinusitis and rhinosinusitis. American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery. http://www.entnet.org/content/allergic-rhinitis-sinusitis-and-rhinosinusitis. Accessed May 28, 2017.
  11. Is rinsing your sinuses with neti pots safe? U.S. Food and Drug Administration. https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm316375.htm. Accessed May 28, 2017.