Expertise and rankings

Experience

Mayo Clinic doctors trained in heart disease (cardiologists) and heart surgery (cardiac surgeons) have vast experience evaluating and treating people with all types of heart conditions.

Doctors trained in treating children with heart conditions (pediatric cardiologists) care for children with congenital heart disease and other heart conditions at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota.

Congenital heart disease expertise

Each year, doctors evaluate and treat more than 8,500 adults with congenital heart disease. Each Mayo Clinic location offers treatment for adults with congenital heart disease in the Adult Congenital Heart Disease Clinic. Staff in the Center for Congenital Heart Disease at Mayo Clinic's campus in Minnesota treats adults and children with all types of congenital heart disease.

Experience in transplants

Mayo Clinic also offers an experienced team in the Heart Transplant Program for people who may need a heart transplant.

Nationally recognized expertise

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for heart and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., is ranked high performing among the Best Hospitals for heart and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester, Minn., is ranked among the Best Children's Hospitals for heart and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report.

With Mayo Clinic's emphasis on collaborative care, specialists at each of the campuses — Minnesota, Arizona and Florida — interact very closely with colleagues at the other campuses and the Mayo Clinic Health System.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic's cardiac surgery and cardiovascular diseases departments' expertise and rankings.

April 06, 2017
References
  1. About congenital heart defects. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/CongenitalHeartDefects/AboutCongenitalHeartDefects/About-Congenital-Heart-Defects_UCM_001217_Article.jsp#.WD8pOpK8x8g. Accessed Nov. 30, 2016.
  2. Congenital heart defects. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/chd/signs. Accessed Nov. 30, 2016.
  3. Pandya B, et al. Congenital heart disease in adults. British Medical Journal. 2016;354:i3905.
  4. Guidelines for treating adults with congenital heart disease. American College of Cardiology. https://www.cardiosmart.org/Heart-Conditions/Guidelines/ACHD. Accessed Nov. 30, 2016.
  5. Living with a congenital heart defect. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/heartdefects/living.html. Accessed Nov. 30, 2016.
  6. Overview of congenital cardiovascular anomalies. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/pediatrics/congenital_cardiovascular_anomalies/overview_of_congenital_cardiovascular_anomalies.html. Accessed Dec. 1, 2016.
  7. Riggins E. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Dec. 4, 2016.