Overview

Adjustment disorders are stress-related conditions. You experience more stress than would normally be expected in response to a stressful or unexpected event, and the stress causes significant problems in your relationships, at work or at school.

Work problems, going away to school, an illness, death of a close family member or any number of life changes can cause stress. Most of the time, people adjust to such changes within a few months. But if you have an adjustment disorder, you continue to have emotional or behavioral reactions that can contribute to feeling anxious or depressed.

You don't have to tough it out on your own, though. Treatment can be brief and it's likely to help you regain your emotional footing.

March 10, 2017
References
  1. Adjustment disorders. In: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-5. 5th ed. Arlington, Va.: American Psychiatric Association; 2013. http://www.psychiatryonline.org. Accessed Oct. 31, 2016.
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  3. Casey P. Adjustment disorder: New developments. Current Psychiatry Report. 2014;16:451.
  4. The road to resilience. American Psychological Association. http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/road-resilience.aspx. Accessed Oct. 31, 2016.
  5. Fighting stress with healthy habits. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/StressManagement/FightStressWithHealthyHabits/Fight-Stress-with-Healthy-Habits_UCM_307992_Article.jsp#.WBeRM2dTHRE. Accessed Oct. 31, 2016.
  6. Sawchuk CN (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Nov. 18, 2016.