Diagnosis

During the physical exam, your doctor will inspect your lower leg for tenderness and swelling. Your doctor might be able to feel a gap in your tendon if it has ruptured completely.

The doctor might ask you to kneel on a chair or lie on your stomach with your feet hanging over the end of the exam table. He or she might then squeeze your calf muscle to see if your foot will automatically flex. If it doesn't, you probably have ruptured your Achilles tendon.

If there's a question about the extent of your Achilles tendon injury — whether it's completely or only partially ruptured — your doctor might order an ultrasound or MRI scan. These painless procedures create images of the tissues of your body.

Aug. 02, 2017
References
  1. Maughan KL. Achilles tendinopathy and tendon rupture. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed June 26, 2017.
  2. Achilles tendon rupture. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=av0003. Accessed June 26, 2017.
  3. Li Q, et al. Minimally invasive versus open surgery for acute Achilles tendon rupture: A systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses. Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research. 2016;11:65.
  4. Zhang H, et al. Surgical versus conservative intervention for acute Achilles tendon rupture: A PRISMA-compliant systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses. Medicine. 2015;94:1.
  5. Functional rehabilitation. American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. http://www.aapmr.org/about-physiatry/conditions-treatments/musculoskeletal-medicine/functional-rehabilitation. Accessed June 27, 2017.
  6. Barfod KW, et al. Nonoperative dynamic treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture: The influence of early weight-bearing on clinical outcome. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. 2014;96:1497.