Warfarin

Warfarin is a blood-thinning medication used to treat and prevent blood clots from forming in blood vessels. One way to evaluate the care of hospital patients receiving warfarin therapy is to look at the percentage of eligible patients whose care meets care guidelines. The goal is 99.3 percent.

Warfarin Care

Check or uncheck the legend icons to view or hide data.

A patient's INR (international normalized ratio) score is determined by a blood test that measures the clotting ability of his or her blood. Serious bleeding risk occurs as a complication of warfarin therapy if the patient's INR becomes too high. The graph above displays the percentage of eligible (appropriate) Mayo Clinic hospital patients receiving warfarin therapy whose care met the standards of care guidelines.

Standards of care

The quality measures listed in the table below are known as the "standards of care" for managing hospitalized patients receiving warfarin therapy. This list includes the medical care widely accepted as the most appropriate care guidelines for the majority of hospitalized patients receiving warfarin therapy.

Standards of care for warfarin therapy An explanation of this care
Percent of hospital patients receiving warfarin whose international normalized ratio (INR) is less than 5 Serious bleeding risk occurs as a complication of warfarin therapy if the patient's INR becomes too high. The target INR level will vary from patient to patient, so it is important to speak with your own doctor to learn what level is safe for you.

Other factors to consider

Where there are opportunities, Mayo Clinic sites have implemented a standard evidence-based warfarin dosing protocol that more safely and consistently provides anticoagulation therapy.