Venous thromboembolism

One way to evaluate the care of patients diagnosed with venous thromboembolism (VTE) is to look at the percentage of patients receiving the timely and effective care measures that are appropriate for them. The goal is 100 percent.

Venous thromboembolism includes a blood clot in a deep vein (deep vein thrombosis) such as a vein in your leg, or a blood clot in a lung (pulmonary embolism).

The graph below displays the percentage of eligible Mayo Clinic patients receiving all the appropriate VTE care measures.

Venous thromboembolism care

Chart.


Timely and effective care

The table below reflects the timely and effective care measures for venous thromboembolism.
Timely and effective care for venous thromboembolism (VTE) Explanation of this care
Percent of hospitalized patients not located in an intensive care area who have an appropriate VTE prevention plan

Hospitalized patients are at a higher risk of developing blood clots.

Guidelines for the prevention of VTE recommend the use of preventative therapies in at-risk patients.

Percent of hospitalized patients located in an intensive care area who have an appropriate VTE prevention plan

Hospitalized patients located in an intensive care area are at a higher risk of developing blood clots.

VTE preventative therapies are recommended.

Percent of VTE patients receiving appropriate anti-blood clotting (anticoagulation) medication overlap therapy

For patients diagnosed with VTE, properly giving medications that decrease the blood's ability to clot (anticoagulation) is potentially lifesaving.

It's important that the transition from non-oral to oral medications "overlap" correctly.

The non-oral and oral medications are briefly given at the same time. The non-oral medication can be stopped when the oral medication has effectively decreased the blood's ability to clot.

Percent of VTE patients who received heparin through a vein (intravenously) and had appropriate monitoring of their dosages and platelets

The risk of a blood clot growing larger or having bleeding complications is decreased if the patient receives a medication called heparin through a vein (intravenously).

This medication decreases the clotting ability of the blood and prevents blood clots from forming in blood vessels.

The dose and laboratory tests are monitored closely.

Percent of VTE patients dismissed on the oral anticoagulant warfarin who were given educational materials during the hospital stay addressing all of the following:
  • Importance of taking warfarin as instructed
  • How intake of certain foods can effect blood clotting times
  • The importance of monitoring blood clotting times through scheduled blood draws
  • Potential for harmful drug reactions or interactions

Warfarin is a medication that decreases the clotting ability of the blood and prevents blood clots from forming in blood vessels.

Warfarin is used to treat VTE. Blood clotting times must be monitored to check for proper dosage and unwanted side effects.

Patient or caregiver education and involvement are essential when taking warfarin and may lower the risk of harmful medication reactions and interactions.

Number of patients diagnosed with VTE during hospitalization, which wasn't present upon admission, who didn't receive VTE prevention therapy between hospital admission and the day before the VTE was identified

The occurrence of preventable VTE contributes to longer hospital stays, higher costs, readmissions and repeated venous thromboembolisms.

Pulmonary embolisms are the most common preventable cause of death among hospitalized patients.

Note: A lower score is better.

Appropriate care measure (ACM) The ACM is a pass-fail measure at the individual patient level that asks whether an eligible patient has received all of the appropriate care for the condition for which he or she is being treated.
For additional information and data visit Medicare Hospital Compare.