Heart attack (acute myocardial infarction)

One way to evaluate the care of patients diagnosed with heart attack (acute myocardial infarction or AMI) is to look at the percentage of patients receiving the timely and effective care measures that are appropriate for them. The goal is 100 percent.

The graph displays the percentage of eligible Mayo Clinic patients diagnosed with heart attack who received all of the appropriate care measures in the list below.

Timely and effective care

The table below reflects the timely and effective care measures for heart attack.

Timely and effective care for heart attack (acute myocardial infarction) Explanation of this care
Percent of heart attack patients given fibrinolytic medication within 30 minutes of arrival for ST-elevation myocardial infarction

Blood clots cause this type of heart attack.

Doctors may give fibrinolytic medication to dissolve blood clots, perform a procedure to open the blockage, or in some cases, they may give medication and perform a procedure.

Percent of heart attack patients given percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 90 minutes of arrival for ST-elevation myocardial infarction

PCI is often the most effective method for opening blocked blood vessels that cause heart attacks.

Doctors may perform PCI to open the blockage, give medication to open the blockage, or in some cases, they may perform the procedure and give medications.

Appropriate care measure (ACM) The ACM is a pass-fail measure at the individual patient level that asks whether an eligible patient has received all of the appropriate care for the condition for which he or she is being treated.
For additional information and data visit Medicare Hospital Compare. May 31, 2014